Green Prize

Awarded biennially, the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design is the foremost award recognizing achievement in this field. Established in 1986 on the occasion of Harvard University’s 350th anniversary and the 50th anniversary of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, the prize recognizes exemplary urban design projects realized anywhere in the world in the past 10 years.

Nominations for the prize are received from the GSD’s extensive network of academics and urban design professionals. Projects must be more than one building or an open space, and are evaluated in terms of their contributions to the public realm and to quality of urban life.

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

Sort by title, author, format, publication date, or price »
6.Cover: The Favela-Bairro Project: Jorge Mario Jáuregui Architects, The Sixth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

The Favela-Bairro Project: Jorge Mario Jáuregui Architects, The Sixth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Machado, Rodolfo

The favelas of Rio de Janeiro are shantytowns that lack even the most basic infrastructure and services. The Favela-Bairro Project, featuring the work of Jorge Mario Jáuregui Architects, seeks to turn these blighted areas into functioning neighborhoods, or bairros.

7.Cover: Residential Waterfront, Borneo Sporenburg, Amsterdam: Adriaan Geuze, West 8 urban design & landscape architecture, The Seventh Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Residential Waterfront, Borneo Sporenburg, Amsterdam: Adriaan Geuze, West 8 urban design & landscape architecture, The Seventh Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Machado, Rodolfo

“When one reads or hears about the vicissitudes of the project’s evolution—about the long approval processes and the large cast of characters—it all seems like an excellent piece of narrative, a great plot replete with subplots leading us to intense episodes of dramatic action.”—from the Introduction

8.Cover: Aleppo: Rehabilitation of the Old City, The Eighth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Aleppo: Rehabilitation of the Old City, The Eighth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Busquets, Joan

In Aleppo, Busquets describes the value of successful urban rehabilitation in this historic setting. The Syrian city of Aleppo won the prestigious Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design for its urban renewal efforts and Busquets offers an innovative take on how these rehabilitation projects are accomplished effectively.

9.Cover: Olympic Sculpture Park for the Seattle Art Museum: The Ninth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Olympic Sculpture Park for the Seattle Art Museum: The Ninth Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

Busquets, Joan

Envisioned as a new urban model for sculpture parks, the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park not only brings art outside the museum walls but also brings the park into the landscape of the city. This study offers an opportunity to take a fresh look at the city and explore some hypotheses about the wider meaning of an urban design project.

10.Cover: Deconstruction/Construction: The Cheonggyecheon Restoration Project in Seoul

Deconstruction/Construction: The Cheonggyecheon Restoration Project in Seoul

Busquets, Joan

The restoration of the Cheonggyecheon River that runs through Seoul, Korea, merits recognition as a seminal project in contemporary urban design. In this well-illustrated volume, contributors consider the ecological, infrastructural, and urban impacts of this exceptional project at the heart of the city.

Sort by title, author, format, publication date, or price »

Back to top

The <i>Chevron</i> Doctrine: Its Rise and Fall, and the Future of the Administrative State, by Thomas W. Merrill, from Harvard University Press

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: A Brief History of Equality, by Thomas Piketty, from Harvard University Press

Five Reasons Why You Should Read Thomas Piketty’s A Brief History of Equality

In his surprising and powerful new work, A Brief History of Equality, Thomas Piketty reminds us that the grand sweep of history gives us reasons to be optimistic. Over the centuries, he shows, we have been moving toward greater equality. We asked him about his impassioned new book: why he wrote it, how it’s optimistic, and what we need to do to continue making progress on creating an equitable world.