Harvard University Physics Department

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: Particles in Our Air: Exposures and Health Effects

Particles in Our Air: Exposures and Health Effects

Spengler, John Daniel
Wilson, Richard

Generated by the use of fossil energy, respirable-sized particles pose a major threat to our environment and health. In this book the hypothesis that fossil fuels are the primary culprit is examined in detail, including the nature, generation, and transport of particulate air pollution.

Cover: A Brief History of the Harvard University Cyclotrons

A Brief History of the Harvard University Cyclotrons

Wilson, Richard

This book describes the work of the second Harvard cyclotron during its 50 years of operation and includes references to about 500 publications and 40 student theses from the work. In its first 20 years, the cyclotron’s primary use was for nuclear physics, particularly for understanding the interaction between two nucleons. During the next 30 years, the emphasis switched to treating patients with proton radiotherapy.

The Brethren: A Story of Faith and Conspiracy in Revolutionary America, by Brendan McConville, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene