Harvard Studies in Medieval Latin

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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1.Cover: Solomon and Marcolf

Solomon and Marcolf

Solomon and Marcolf pits wise Solomon, famous from the Bible, against a wily peasant named Marcolf. Cited by Bakhtin in Rabelais and His World, Solomon and Marcolf is widely known by name. But until now it has not been translated into any modern language. The present volume offers an introduction, followed by the Latin and English, detailed commentary, and reproductions of woodcut illustrations from the 1514 edition.

2.Cover: De nobilitate animi

De nobilitate animi

Guillelmus de Aragonia
Paden, William D.
Trovato, Mario

Working in a renewed Aristotelian tradition, Guillelmus de Aragonia wrote De nobilitate animi, “On Nobility of Mind,” around 1280–1290 and taught that true nobility is an acquired, not inborn, quality. This edition, based in part on hitherto unknown manuscripts, presents the Latin text with an English translation, an introduction, and appendix.

3.Cover: The Cambridge Songs (<i>Carmina Cantabrigiensia</i>)

The Cambridge Songs (Carmina Cantabrigiensia)

Ziolkowski, Jan M.

The Cambridge Songs is the most important anthology of songs from before the thirteenth-century Carmina Burana. It contains panegyrics and dirges, political poems, comic tales, religious and didactic poems, and poetry of spring and love. This edition includes a substantial introduction, the Latin texts and English prose, and extensive commentary.

Murty Classical Library of India

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene