A History of the World

Tracing the evolution of global society from prehistoric times to the present, this innovative six-volume history of an interconnected world offers an exciting challenge to traditional understandings of familiar events and eras. Eschewing the customary encyclopedic approach of myriad short entries, each volume offers substantive interpretive essays by prominent historians who systematically explore developments and trends within a global historical framework. This integrated history is a joint publication of Harvard University Press and C. H. Beck.

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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1.Cover: Making Civilizations: The World before 600

Making Civilizations: The World before 600

Gehrke, Hans-Joachim

3.Cover: Empires and Encounters: 1350–1750

Empires and Encounters: 1350–1750

Reinhard, Wolfgang

4.Cover: An Emerging Modern World: 1750–1870

An Emerging Modern World: 1750–1870

Conrad, Sebastian
Osterhammel, Jürgen

5.Cover: A World Connecting: 1870–1945

A World Connecting: 1870–1945

Rosenberg, Emily S.

Between 1870 and 1945, advances in communication and transportation simultaneously expanded and shrank the world. In five interpretive essays, A World Connecting goes beyond nations, empires, and world wars to capture the era’s defining feature: the profound and disruptive shift toward an ever more rapidly integrating world.

6.Cover: Global Interdependence: The World after 1945

Global Interdependence: The World after 1945

Iriye, Akira

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The Hacker and the State: Cyber Attacks and the New Normal of Geopolitics, by Ben Buchanan, from Harvard University Press

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

“Predictive Policing” and Racial Profiling

While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”