Harvard Design Studies

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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1.Cover: Common Frameworks: Rethinking the Developmental City in China

Common Frameworks: Rethinking the Developmental City in China

Lee, Christopher C. M.

The three-year Harvard GSD AECOM Project on China aimed at recuperating an idea of the city and pursuing alternative forms of urbanization in response to challenges posed by the developmental city in China. Common Frameworks unites design projects from the AECOM studio with research on cultural, political, and historical aspects of the city.

2.Cover: Spatializing Politics: Essays on Power and Place

Spatializing Politics: Essays on Power and Place

Wendel, Delia Duong Ba
Aidoo, Fallon Samuels

Spatializing Politics is an anthology of emerging scholarship that treats built and imagined spaces as critical to knowing political power. Essays illustrate how buildings and landscapes as disparate as Rust Belt railway stations and rural Rwandan hills become tools of political action and frameworks for political authority.

3.Cover: Airport Landscape: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age

Airport Landscape: Urban Ecologies in the Aerial Age

Dümpelmann, Sonja
Waldheim, Charles

Airports are central to the life of cities but have remained relatively peripheral in design discourse. In Airport Landscape, case study projects for the ecological enhancement of operating airports and the conversion of abandoned airports demonstrate, through a range of practices, the significance of airports as sites of design.

Prague: Belonging in the Modern City, by Chad Bryant, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene