Villa I Tatti: The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies is a center for advanced research in the humanities located in Florence, Italy, that belongs to Harvard University. It also houses a library and an art collection and is the site of Italian- and English-style gardens.

Villa I Tatti’s ambitious and varied publication program serves as a bridge between I Tatti and the international scholarly community. Besides the journal I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance, I Tatti takes pride in five book series: the I Tatti Renaissance Library, the Bernard Berenson Lectures, the I Tatti Research Series, the I Tatti Studies in Italian Renaissance History, and the Villa I Tatti Series.

Sub-Collections

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: Bernard Berenson: Formation and Heritage

Bernard Berenson: Formation and Heritage

Connors, Joseph
Waldman, Louis A.

Bernard Berenson: Formation and Heritage explores the intellectual world of Berenson (1865–1959), who put the connoisseurship of Renaissance art on a firm footing at the turn of the twentieth century. Essays explore his relationships with various cultural figures including William James, Jean Paul Richter, Katherine Dunham, and many others.

Cover: Sassetta: The Borgo San Sepolcro Altarpiece

Sassetta: The Borgo San Sepolcro Altarpiece

Israëls, Machtelt

Sassetta, the subtle genius from Siena, revolutionized Italian painting with an altarpiece for the small Tuscan town of Borgo San Sepolcro in 1437–1444. This book solves the three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle of this masterwork’s reconstruction and, on a firm scientific foundation, restores it to its vivid historical context.

Cover: Italy and Hungary: Humanism and Art in the Early Renaissance. Acts of an International Conference, Florence, Villa I Tatti, June 6–8, 2007

Italy and Hungary: Humanism and Art in the Early Renaissance. Acts of an International Conference, Florence, Villa I Tatti, June 6–8, 2007

Farbaky, Péter
Waldman, Louis A.

The twenty-two essays collected here delve into recent research on the development of humanism and art in the Hungary of King Matthias Corvinus and his successors. Richly illustrated with new photography, this book eloquently documents and explores the unique role played by the Hungarian court in the cultural history of Renaissance Europe.

Cover: Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors, Volumes 1 and 2

Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors, Volumes 1 and 2

Israëls, Machtelt
Waldman, Louis A.

The two richly illustrated volumes of Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors demonstrate Villa I Tatti’s role as the world’s leading center for Italian Renaissance studies. Gathered to honor I Tatti’s director from 2002 to 2010, the 177 essays represent the cutting edge of Renaissance scholarship in art history, literature, music, and more.

Cover: The Medici: Citizens and Masters

The Medici: Citizens and Masters

Black, Robert
Law, John E.

The Medici: Citizens and Masters offers a novel, comparative approach to examining Medici power and influence in Florence. Contributors from diverse perspectives set Medici rule against princely states such as Milan and Ferrara, and they ask how much the Medici changed Florence, contrasting their supremacy with earlier Florentine regimes.

Cover: San Lorenzo: A Florentine Church

San Lorenzo: A Florentine Church

Gaston, Robert W.
Waldman, Louis A.

This comprehensive, interdisciplinary collection illuminates many previously unexplored aspects of the Basilica of San Lorenzo’s history, extending from its Early Christian foundation to the modern era. San Lorenzo depicts this church as a living Florentine institution, continually reshaped by complex historical forces.

Cover: In Defense of Common Sense: Lorenzo Valla's Humanist Critique of Scholastic Philosophy

In Defense of Common Sense: Lorenzo Valla's Humanist Critique of Scholastic Philosophy

Nauta, Lodi

One of the leading humanists of Quattrocento Italy, Lorenzo Valla (1406–1457) has been praised as a brilliant debunker of medieval scholastic philosophy. In this book Lodi Nauta seeks a more balanced assessment, presenting us with the first comprehensive analysis of the humanist’s attempt at radical reform of Aristotelian scholasticism.

Cover: The Return of Lucretius to Renaissance Florence

The Return of Lucretius to Renaissance Florence

Brown, Alison

Alison Brown demonstrates how Florentine thinkers used Lucretius—earlier and more widely than has been supposed—to provide a radical critique of prevailing orthodoxies. She enhances our understanding of the “revolution” in sixteenth-century political thinking and our definition of the Renaissance within newly discovered worlds and new social networks.

Cover: Venice's Most Loyal City: Civic Identity in Renaissance Brescia

Venice's Most Loyal City: Civic Identity in Renaissance Brescia

Bowd, Stephen D.

This innovative microhistory of a fascinating yet neglected city shows how its loyalty to Venice was tested by military attack, economic downturn, and demographic collapse. Despite these trials, Brescia experienced cultural revival and political transformation, which Stephen Bowd uses to explain state formation in a powerful region of Renaissance Italy.

Cover: Writing History in Renaissance Italy: Leonardo Bruni and the Uses of the Past

Writing History in Renaissance Italy: Leonardo Bruni and the Uses of the Past

Ianziti, Gary

Leonardo Bruni is widely recognized as the most important humanist historian of the early Renaissance. Gary Ianziti undertakes a systematic work-by-work investigation of the full range of Bruni’s output in history and biography, and assesses in detail the impact of the Greek historians on humanist methods of historical writing.

Cover: The Duke and the Stars: Astrology and Politics in Renaissance Milan

The Duke and the Stars: Astrology and Politics in Renaissance Milan

Azzolini, Monica

The Duke and the Stars explores science and medicine as studied and practiced in fifteenth-century Italy, including how astrology was taught in relation to astronomy. It illustrates how the “predictive art” of astrology was often a critical, secretive source of information for Italian Renaissance rulers, particularly in times of crisis.

Cover: Printing a Mediterranean World: Florence, Constantinople, and the Renaissance of Geography

Printing a Mediterranean World: Florence, Constantinople, and the Renaissance of Geography

Roberts, Sean

In 1482 Francesco Berlinghieri produced the Geographia, a book of over 100 folio leaves describing the world in Italian verse interleaved with lavishly engraved maps. Roberts demonstrates that the Geographia represents the moment of transition between printing and manuscript culture, while forming a critical base for the rise of modern cartography.

Cover: Cultures of Charity: Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy

Cultures of Charity: Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy

Terpstra, Nicholas

Renaissance debates about politics and gender led to pioneering forms of poor relief, devised to help women get a start in life. These included orphanages for illegitimate children and forced labor in workhouses, but also women’s shelters and early forms of maternity benefits, unemployment insurance, food stamps, and credit union savings plans.

Cover: The Pulpit and the Press in Reformation Italy

The Pulpit and the Press in Reformation Italy

Michelson, Emily

Italian sermons tell a story of the Reformation that credits preachers with using the pulpit, pen, and printing press to keep Italy Catholic when the region’s violent religious wars made the future uncertain, and with fashioning a post-Reformation Catholicism that would survive the competition and religious choice of their own time and ours.

Cover: The Fruit of Liberty: Political Culture in the Florentine Renaissance, 1480-1550

The Fruit of Liberty: Political Culture in the Florentine Renaissance, 1480-1550

Baker, Nicholas Scott

In the sixteenth century, the city-state of Florence failed. In its place the Medicis created a principality, becoming first dukes of Florence and then grand dukes of Tuscany. The Fruit of Liberty analyzes the slow transformations that predated and facilitated the institutional shift from republic to principality, from citizen to subject.

Cover: Reviving the Eternal City: Rome and the Papal Court, 1420-1447

Reviving the Eternal City: Rome and the Papal Court, 1420-1447

McCahill, Elizabeth

In the first half of the fifteenth century, Rome and the papal court were caught between conflicting realities—between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, conciliarism and papalism, an image of a restored republic and a dream of a papal capital. Elizabeth McCahill explores the transformation of Rome’s ancient legacy into a potent cultural myth.

Cover: Orpheus in the Marketplace: Jacopo Peri and the Economy of Late Renaissance Florence

Orpheus in the Marketplace: Jacopo Peri and the Economy of Late Renaissance Florence

Carter, Tim
Goldthwaite, Richard A.

This record of Florentine musician Jacopo Peri’s wide-ranging investments and activities in the marketplace enables the first detailed account of the Florentine economy in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and opens a completely new perspective on one of Europe’s principal centers of capitalism.

Cover: A Mattress Maker's Daughter: The Renaissance Romance of Don Giovanni de’ Medici and Livia Vernazza

A Mattress Maker's Daughter: The Renaissance Romance of Don Giovanni de’ Medici and Livia Vernazza

Dooley, Brendan

In explaining an improbable liaison and its consequences, A Mattress Maker’s Daughter explores changing concepts of love and romance, new standards of public and private conduct, and emerging attitudes toward property and legitimacy just as the age of Renaissance humanism gives way to the Counter Reformation and Early Modern Europe.

Cover: A Great and Wretched City: Promise and Failure in Machiavelli’s Florentine Political Thought

A Great and Wretched City: Promise and Failure in Machiavelli’s Florentine Political Thought

Jurdjevic, Mark

Dispelling the myth that Florentine politics offered only negative lessons, Mark Jurdjevic shows that significant aspects of Machiavelli’s political thought were inspired by his native city. Machiavelli’s contempt for Florence’s shortcomings was a direct function of his considerable estimation of the city’s unrealized political potential.

Cover: The Medicean Succession: Monarchy and Sacral Politics in Duke Cosimo dei Medici’s Florence

The Medicean Succession: Monarchy and Sacral Politics in Duke Cosimo dei Medici’s Florence

Murry, Gregory

Cosimo dei Medici stabilized ducal finances, secured his borders, doubled his territory, attracted scholars and artists to his court, academy, and universities, and dissipated fractious Florentine politics. These triumphs were far from a foregone conclusion, as Gregory Murry shows in this study of how Cosimo crafted his image as a sacral monarch.

Cover: The Prince's Body: Vincenzo Gonzaga and Renaissance Medicine

The Prince's Body: Vincenzo Gonzaga and Renaissance Medicine

Finucci, Valeria

Using four notorious moments in the life of Duke Vincenzo Gonzaga of Mantua, Valeria Finucci explores changing early modern concepts of sexuality, reproduction, beauty, and aging. She deftly marries salacious tales with historical analysis to tell a broader story of Italian Renaissance cultural adjustments and obsessions.

Cover: Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance

Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance

Palmer, Ada

Ada Palmer explores how Renaissance poets and philologists, not scientists, rescued Lucretius and his atomism theory. This heterodoxy circulated in the premodern world, not on the conspicuous stage of heresy trials and public debates but in the classrooms, libraries, studies, and bookshops where quiet scholars met transformative ideas.

Cover: Daughters of Alchemy: Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy

Daughters of Alchemy: Women and Scientific Culture in Early Modern Italy

Ray, Meredith K.

Meredith Ray shows that women were at the vanguard of empirical culture during the Scientific Revolution. They experimented with medicine and alchemy at home and in court, debated cosmological discoveries in salons and academies, and in their writings used their knowledge of natural philosophy to argue for women’s intellectual equality to men.

Cover: Everyday Renaissances: The Quest for Cultural Legitimacy in Venice

Everyday Renaissances: The Quest for Cultural Legitimacy in Venice

Ross, Sarah Gwyneth

Revealing an Italian Renaissance beyond Michelangelo and the Medici, Sarah Gwyneth Ross recovers the experiences of everyday people who were inspired to pursue humanistic learning. Physicians were often the most avid professionals seeking to earn the respect of their betters, advance their families, and secure honorable remembrance after death.

Cover: Success and Suppression: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy in the Renaissance

Success and Suppression: Arabic Sciences and Philosophy in the Renaissance

Hasse, Dag Nikolaus

Dag Nikolaus Hasse shows how ideological and scientific motives led to the decline of Arabic traditions in European culture. The Renaissance was a turning point: on the one hand, Arabic scientific traditions reached their peak of influence in Europe; on the other, during this period the West began to forget, or suppress, its debt to Arabic culture.

Cover: Clerical Households in Late Medieval Italy

Clerical Households in Late Medieval Italy

Cossar, Roisin

Roisin Cossar examines how clerics managed efforts to reform their domestic lives in the decades after the Black Death. Despite reformers’ desire for clerics to remain celibate, clerical households resembled those of the laity, and priests’ lives included apprenticeships in youth, fatherhood in middle age, and reliance on their families in old age.

Cover: The Avignon Papacy Contested: An Intellectual History from Dante to Catherine of Siena

The Avignon Papacy Contested: An Intellectual History from Dante to Catherine of Siena

Falkeid, Unn

Unn Falkeid considers the work of six fourteenth-century writers who waged literary war against the Avignon papacy’s increasing claims of supremacy over secular rulers—a conflict that engaged contemporary critics from every corner of Europe. She illuminates arguments put forth by Dante, Petrarch, William of Ockham, Catherine of Siena, and others.

Cover: Giannozzo Manetti: The Life of a Florentine Humanist

Giannozzo Manetti: The Life of a Florentine Humanist

Marsh, David

Giannozzo Manetti was one of the most remarkable figures of the Italian Renaissance, though today his works are unfamiliar in English. In this authoritative biography, the first ever in English, David Marsh guides readers through the vast range of Manetti’s writings, which epitomized the new humanist scholarship of the Quattrocento.

Cover: Forgotten Healers: Women and the Pursuit of Health in Late Renaissance Italy

Forgotten Healers: Women and the Pursuit of Health in Late Renaissance Italy

Strocchia, Sharon T.

In Renaissance Italy women from all walks of life played a central role in health care and the early development of medical science. Observing that the frontlines of care are often found in the household and other spaces thought of as female, Sharon Strocchia encourages us to rethink women’s place in the history of medicine.

Cover: A Convert’s Tale: Art, Crime, and Jewish Apostasy in Renaissance Italy

A Convert’s Tale: Art, Crime, and Jewish Apostasy in Renaissance Italy

Herzig, Tamar

Salomone da Sesso was a virtuoso goldsmith in Renaissance Italy. Brought down by a sex scandal, he saved his skin by converting to Catholicism. Tamar Herzig explores Salamone’s world—his Jewish upbringing, his craft and patrons, and homosexuality. In his struggle for rehabilitation, we see how precarious and contested was the meaning of conversion.

Cover: Famous Women

Famous Women

Boccaccio, Giovanni
Brown, Virginia

After the composition of the Decameron, and under the influence of Petrarch’s humanism, Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375) devoted the last decades of his life to compiling encyclopedic works in Latin. Among them is Famous Women, the first collection of biographies in Western literature devoted exclusively to women. This edition presents the first English translation based on the autograph manuscript of the Latin.

Cover: History of the Florentine People, Volume 1: Books I-IV

History of the Florentine People, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Bruni, Leonardo
Hankins, James

Bruni (1370–1444), the leading civic humanist of the Italian Renaissance, served as apostolic secretary to four popes (1405–1414) and chancellor of Florence (1427–1444). His History of the Florentine People is generally considered the first modern work of history. This edition makes it available for the first time in English translation.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 1: Books I–IV

Platonic Theology, Volume 1: Books I–IV

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: Momus

Momus

Alberti, Leon Battista
Knight, Sarah
Brown, Virginia

Momus is the most ambitious literary creation of Leon Battista Alberti, the humanist-scientist-artist and “universal man“ of the Italian Renaissance. In this dark comedy, written around 1450, Alberti charts the fortunes of his anti-hero Momus, god of criticism. This edition offers a new Latin text and the first full translation into English.

Cover: Later Travels

Later Travels

Cyriac of Ancona
Bodnar, Edward W.

Cyriac of Ancona was among the first to study the physical remains of the ancient world in person and for that reason is sometimes regarded as the father of classical archaeology. Cyriac’s accounts of his travels, with their commentary reflecting his wide-ranging antiquarian, political, religious, and commercial interests, provide a fascinating record of the encounter of the Renaissance world with the legacy of classical antiquity. The Latin texts assembled for this edition have been newly edited and most of them appear here for the first time in English.

Cover: Humanist Educational Treatises

Humanist Educational Treatises

Kallendorf, Craig W.

Here are four of the most important theoretical statements that emerged from the nascent humanist movement during the Italian Renaissance: Vergerio, “The Character and Studies Befitting a Free-Born Youth; Bruni, “The Study of Literature”; Piccolomini (Pope Pius II), “The Education of Boys”; and Guarino, “A Program of Teaching and Learning.”

Cover: Silvae

Silvae

Poliziano, Angelo
Fantazzi, Charles

Angelo Poliziano (1454–1494) was one of the great scholar-poets of the Renaissance and a leading figure in the circle of Lorenzo de’Medici, “il Magnifico,” in Florence. His “Silvae” are poetical introductions to his courses in literature at the University of Florence, written in Latin hexameters. They not only contain some of the finest Latin poetry of the Renaissance, but also afford unique insight into the poetical credo of a brilliant scholar as he considers the works of his Greek and Latin predecessors as well as of his contemporaries writing in Italian.

Cover: Invectives

Invectives

Petrarca, Francesco
Marsh, David

Francesco Petrarca (1304–1374), one of the greatest Italian poets, was also a leader in the Renaissance movement to revive ancient Roman language and literature. This new critical edition of the Invectives, intended to revive the eloquence of Cicero, are directed against scholastic philosophy and medicine and the dominance of French culture.

Cover: Biographical Writings

Biographical Writings

Manetti, Giannozzo
Baldassarri, Stefano U.
Bagemihl, Rolf

Manetti (1396–1459) was a leading humanist biographer of the Renaissance. This volume brings together his biographies of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio, which helped establish the canon of Italian literature, and his parallel lives of Socrates and Seneca—the standard biographical sources for those philosophers throughout the early modern period.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Platonic Theology, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: On Discovery

On Discovery

Vergil, Polydore
Copenhaver, Brian P.

The most popular work of the Italian humanist Polydore Vergil (1470–1555), On Discovery (De inventoribus rerum, 1499), was the first comprehensive account of discoveries and inventions written since antiquity. This is the first English translation of a critical edition based on the Latin texts published in Polydore Vergil’s lifetime.

Cover: Commentaries, Volume 1: Books I-II

Commentaries, Volume 1: Books I-II

Pius II
Meserve, Margaret
Simonetta, Marcello

The Commentaries of Pius II (1405–1464), the only autobiography ever written by a pope, was composed in elegant humanistic Latin modeled on Caesar and Cicero. This edition contains a fresh Latin text based on the last manuscript written in Pius’s lifetime and an updated and corrected version of the 1937 translation.

Cover: Lives of the Popes, Volume 1: Antiquity

Lives of the Popes, Volume 1: Antiquity

Platina, Bartolomeo
D’Elia, Anthony F.

Imprisoned for conspiring against Pope Paul II, Bartolomeo Platina (1421–1481) returned to favor under Pope Sixtus IV, and composed his most famous work, a biographical compendium of the Roman popes from St. Peter down to his own time. The work critically synthesized a wide range of sources and became the standard reference work on papal history for early modern Europe. This edition contains the first complete translation into English and an improved Latin text.

Cover: Italy Illuminated, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Italy Illuminated, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Flavio, Biondo
White, Jeffrey A.

Flavio, humanist and historian, was a pioneering figure in the Renaissance recovery of classical antiquity. His Italia Illustrata, here for the first time in English, is a topographical work describing Italy region by region. A quintessential work of Renaissance antiquarianism, its aim is to explore the Roman roots of the Renaissance world.

Cover: Odes

Odes

Filelfo, Francesco
Robin, Diana

Filelfo (1398–1481), one of the great scholar-poets of the Italian Renaissance, was the principal humanist working in Lombardy in the middle of the Quattrocento and served as court poet to the Visconti and Sforza dukes of Milan. His Odes constitute the first complete cycle of Horatian odes since classical antiquity.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 3: Books IX–XI

Platonic Theology, Volume 3: Books IX–XI

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: History of the Florentine People, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

History of the Florentine People, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Bruni, Leonardo
Hankins, James

Leonardo Bruni’s History of the Florentine People in twelve books is generally considered the first modern work of history, and was widely imitated by humanist historians for two centuries after its official publication by the Florentine Signoria in 1442. This edition makes it available for the first time in English translation.

Cover: History of the Florentine People, Volume 3: Books IX-XII. Memoirs

History of the Florentine People, Volume 3: Books IX-XII. Memoirs

Bruni, Leonardo
Hankins, James
Bradley, D. J. W.

Leonardo Bruni (1370–1444) was the best-selling author of the fifteenth century. His History of the Florentine People is generally considered the first modern work of history. This third volume concludes the edition, the first to make the work available in English translation. It includes Bruni’s Memoirs, an autobiographical account of the events of his lifetime, and cumulative indexes to the complete work.

Cover: Famous Women

Famous Women

Boccaccio, Giovanni
Brown, Virginia

The first collection of biographies in Western literature devoted exclusively to women, Giovanni Boccaccio’s Famous Women affords a fascinating glimpse of a moment in history when medieval attitudes toward women were beginning to give way to more modern views of their potential.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 4: Books XII–XIV

Platonic Theology, Volume 4: Books XII–XIV

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: Short Epics

Short Epics

Vegio, Maffeo
Putnam, Michael C. J.
Hankins, James

Maffeo Vegio (1407–1458) was the outstanding Latin poet of the first half of the 15th century. This volume includes Book XIII of Vergil’s Aeneid, the famous continuation of the Roman epic, which was popular in the later Renaissance, printed many times and translated into every major European language. It also contains three other epic works.

Cover: Republics and Kingdoms Compared

Republics and Kingdoms Compared

Brandolini, Aurelio Lippo
Hankins, James

A Socratic dialogue set in the court of King Mattias Corvinus of Hungary (ca. 1490), Republics and Kingdoms Compared depicts a debate between the king and a Florentine merchant at his court on the relative merits of republics and kingdoms. This is the first critical edition and the first translation into any language.

Cover: Letters, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Letters, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Poliziano, Angelo
Butler, Shane

Poliziano was one of the great scholar-poets of the Italian Renaissance. This volume illuminates his close friendship with Pico della Mirandola and includes much of the correspondence about the composition and reception of his Miscellanies, a revolutionary work of philology. It also includes his famous letter on the death of Lorenzo de’ Medici.

Cover: History of Venice, Volume 1: Books I-IV

History of Venice, Volume 1: Books I-IV

Bembo, Pietro
Ulery, Robert W.

Pietro Bembo (1470–1547), a Venetian nobleman, later a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, was the most celebrated Latin stylist of his day and was widely admired for his writings in Italian as well. The History of Venice was published after Bembo’s death, in Latin and in his own Italian version. This edition, in three volumes, makes it available for the first time in English translation.

Cover: Lyric Poetry. Etna

Lyric Poetry. Etna

Bembo, Pietro
Chatfield, Mary P.
Radice, Betty

Pietro Bembo (1470–1547), scholar and critic, was one of the most admired Latinists of his day. The poems in this volume come from all periods of his life and reflect both his erudition and his wide-ranging friendships. This volume also includes the prose dialogue Etna, an account of Bembo’s ascent of Mt. Etna in Sicily during his student days.

Cover: Baiae

Baiae

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Dennis, Rodney G.

Giovanni Gioviano Pontano was an important humanist and scholar of Renaissance Italy. He was also the most innovative and versatile Latin poet of Quattrocento Italy. His Two Books of Hendecasyllables, given the subtitle Baiae, are the elegant offspring of Pontano’s leisure, written to celebrate love, good wine, friendship, nature, and all the pleasures of life to be found at the seaside resort of Baiae on the Bay of Naples.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 5: Books XV–XVI

Platonic Theology, Volume 5: Books XV–XVI

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: Platonic Theology, Volume 6: Books XVII–XVIII

Platonic Theology, Volume 6: Books XVII–XVIII

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.
Hankins, James

Platonic Theology is the visionary and philosophical masterpiece of Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This work, translated into English for the first time, is a key to understanding the art, thought, culture, and spirituality of the Renaissance.

Cover: Humanist Comedies

Humanist Comedies

Grund, Gary R.

Collected here, Vergerio’s Paulus, Philodoxeos fabula by Alberti, Philogenia et Epiphebus by Pisani, Chrysis by Piccolomini (later Pope Pius II), and Medio’s Epirota span nearly the entire Quattrocento and are a valuable gauge of its changing literary tastes, tastes nourished by the ancient comic drama of Plautus and Terence.

Cover: Writings on Church and Reform

Writings on Church and Reform

Nicholas of Cusa
Izbicki, Thomas M.

Nicholas of Cusa (1401–1464), a student of canon law who became a Catholic cardinal, was widely considered the most important original philosopher of the Renaissance. He wrote principally on theology, philosophy, and church politics. This volume makes most of Nicholas’s other writings on Church and reform available in English for the first time.

Cover: History of Venice, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

History of Venice, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Bembo, Pietro
Ulery, Robert W.

Bembo (1470–1547), a Venetian nobleman, later a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, was the most celebrated Latin stylist of his day and was widely admired for his writings in Italian. Named official historian of Venice in 1529, Bembo began to compose in Latin his continuation of the city’s history in 12 books, covering the years from 1487–1513.

Cover: Commentaries, Volume 2: Books III-IV

Commentaries, Volume 2: Books III-IV

Pius II
Meserve, Margaret
Simonetta, Marcello

The Renaissance popes were among the most enlightened and generous patrons of arts and letters in the Europe of their day. Commentaries, the only autobiography ever written by a pope, was composed in elegant humanistic Latin modeled on Caesar and Cicero. This edition contains a fresh Latin text and an updated translation.

Cover: History of Venice, Volume 3: Books IX-XII

History of Venice, Volume 3: Books IX-XII

Bembo, Pietro
Ulery, Robert W.

Much of Pietro Bembo’s work is devoted to the external affairs of Venice, principally conflicts with other European states and with the Turks in the East. The History of Venice was published after his death, in Latin and in his own Italian version. This edition, completed by this third volume, makes it available for the first time in English translation.

Cover: Ciceronian Controversies

Ciceronian Controversies

DellaNeva, JoAnn
Duvick, Brian

The main literary dispute of the Renaissance pitted those Neo-Latin writers favoring Cicero alone as the apotheosis of Latin prose against those following an eclectic array of literary models. This Ciceronian controversy pervades the texts and letters collected for the first time in this volume.

Cover: Latin Poetry

Latin Poetry

Sannazaro, Jacopo
Putnam, Michael C. J.

Sannazaro (1456–1530) is most famous for having written the first pastoral romance in European literature, the Arcadia (1504). But after this work, he devoted himself entirely to Latin poetry modeled on his beloved Virgil. In addition to his epic The Virgin Birth (1526), he also composed Piscatory Eclogues, an adaption of the eclogue form.

Cover: Baldo, Volume 1: Books I-XII

Baldo, Volume 1: Books I-XII

Folengo, Teofilo
Mullaney, Ann E.

Teofilo Folengo (1491–1544) was a native of Mantua and a member of the Benedictine order, later to become a runaway monk and satirist. Blending Latin and various Italian dialects in a deliberately droll manner, Baldo follows a sort of French royal juvenile delinquent through imprisonment, fantastical adventures, and a journey to the underworld. This edition provides the first English translation of this hilarious send-up of the ancient epic and Renaissance chivalric romance traditions.

Cover: On the Donation of Constantine

On the Donation of Constantine

Valla, Lorenzo
Bowersock, G. W.

Lorenzo Valla (1407–1457) was the most important theorist of the humanist movement. His most famous work is On the Donation of Constantine, an oration in which Valla uses new philological methods to attack the authenticity of the most important document justifying the papacy’s claims to temporal rule. It appears here in a new translation with introduction and notes by G. W. Bowersock, based on the critical text of Wolfram Setz.

Cover: The Hermaphrodite

The Hermaphrodite

Beccadelli, Antonio
Parker, Holt

The Hermaphrodite’s open celebration of vice, particularly sodomy, earned it public burnings, threats of excommunication, banishment to the closed sections of libraries, and a devoted following. Antonio Beccadelli combined the comic realism of Italian popular verse with the language of Martial to explore the underside of the early Renaissance.

Cover: Sacred Painting. Museum

Sacred Painting. Museum

Borromeo, Federico
Rothwell, Kenneth S.

Federico Borromeo founded the Ambrosiana library, art collection, and academy in Milan. Sacred Painting (1624) laid out the rules that artists should follow when creating religious art. Museum (1625) walked the reader through the Ambrosiana’s collection, offering some of the earliest critiques to survive on works by Leonardo, Titian, and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Cover: Poems

Poems

Landino, Cristoforo
Chatfield, Mary P.

Cristoforo Landino (1424–1498) was one of the great scholar-poets of the Renaissance. His most substantial work of poetry was his Three Books on Xandra. Also included in this volume is the “Carmina Varia,” a collection whose centerpiece is a group of elegies directed to the Venetian humanist Bernardo Bembo.

Cover: Essays and Dialogues

Essays and Dialogues

Scala, Bartolomeo
Watkins, Renée Neu

Scala (1430–1497) trained in the law and rose to prominence serving as secretary and treasurer to the Medicis and chancellor of the Guelf party before becoming first chancellor of Florence. This volume collects works from throughout his career that show the influence of fellow humanists such as Ficino, Pope Pius II, and Pico della Mirandola.

Cover: Baldo, Volume 2: Books XIII-XXV

Baldo, Volume 2: Books XIII-XXV

Folengo, Teofilo
Mullaney, Ann E.

Folengo (1491–1544) was born in Mantua and joined the Benedictine order, but became a runaway monk and satirist of monasticism. In 1517 he published—as “Merlin Cocaio”—the first version of his macaronic narrative poem Baldo. This edition provides the first English translation of this send-up of ancient epic and Renaissance chivalric romance.

Cover: Invectives

Invectives

Petrarca, Francesco
Marsh, David

Francesco Petrarca, one of the greatest of Italian poets, was also the leading spirit in the Renaissance movement to revive ancient Roman language and literature. Petrarch’s four Invectives, written in Latin, were inspired by the eloquence of the great Roman orator Cicero. The new translations in this volume include the first English translation of three of the four invectives.

Cover: On the Donation of Constantine

On the Donation of Constantine

Valla, Lorenzo
Bowersock, G. W.

Lorenzo Valla (1407–1457) was the leading theorist of the Renaissance humanist movement. In On the Donation of Constantine he uses new philological methods to attack the authenticity of the most important document justifying the papacy’s claims to temporal rule, in a brilliant analysis that is often seen as marking the beginning of modern textual criticism. This volume provides a new English translation with introduction and notes by G. W. Bowersock.

Cover: Commentaries on Plato, Volume 1: <i>Phaedrus</i> and <i>Ion</i>

Commentaries on Plato, Volume 1: Phaedrus and Ion

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.

Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus, was largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. This volume contains Ficino’s extended analysis and commentary on the Phaedrus.

Cover: Christiad

Christiad

Vida, Marco Girolamo
Gardner, James

Marco Girolamo Vida (1485–1566), humanist and bishop, came to prominence as a Latin poet in the Rome of Leo X and Clement VII. Leo commissioned this famous epic, a retelling of the life of Christ in the style of Vergil, which was published in 1535. This translation, accompanied by extensive notes, is based on a new edition of the Latin text.

Cover: Book on Music

Book on Music

Florentius de Faxolis
Blackburn, Bonnie J.
Holford-Strevens, Leofranc

Edited here for the first time is Florentius de Faxolis’s music treatise for Cardinal Ascanio Sforza. The richly illuminated small parchment codex bears witness to the musical interests of the cardinal, himself an avid singer. The author’s unusual insights into the musical thinking of his day are discussed in the ample commentary.

Cover: Genealogy of the Pagan Gods, Volume 1: Books I–V

Genealogy of the Pagan Gods, Volume 1: Books I–V

Boccaccio, Giovanni
Solomon, Jon

The goal of Boccaccio’s Genealogy of the Pagan Gods is to plunder ancient and medieval literary sources to create a massive synthesis of Greek and Roman mythology. This is volume 1 of a three-volume set of Boccaccio’s complete 15-book work. It contains a famous defense of the value of studying ancient pagan poetry in a Christian world.

Cover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1: Book I

Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1: Book I

Valla, Lorenzo
Copenhaver, Brian P.
Nauta, Lodi

The Dialectical Disputations, translated here for the first time into any modern language, is Lorenzo Valla’s principal contribution to the philosophy of language and logic. Valla sought to replace the scholastic tradition of Aristotelian logic with a new logic based on the historical usage of classical Latin and on a commonsense approach.

Cover: Humanist Tragedies

Humanist Tragedies

Grund, Gary R.

Humanist Tragedies offers a sampling of Latin drama from the Tre- and Quattrocento. These five tragedies—Ecerinis, Achilleis, Progne, Hyempsal, and Fernandus Servatus—were nourished by a potent amalgam of classical, medieval, and pre-humanist sources. Humanist tragedy testifies to momentous changes in literary conventions during the Renaissance.

Cover: Modern Poets

Modern Poets

Giraldi, Lilio Gregorio
Grant, John N.

Lilio Gregorio Giraldi authored many works on literary history, mythology, and antiquities. Among the most famous are his dialogues, modeled on Cicero’s Brutus, translated here into English for the first time. The work gives a panoramic view of European poetry in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century, concentrating above all on Italy.

Cover: Letters to Friends

Letters to Friends

Fonzio, Bartolomeo
Daneloni, Alessandro
Davies, Martin

The letters of Bartolomeo Fonzio—a leading literary figure in Florence of the time of Lorenzo de’ Medici and Machiavelli—are a window into the world of Renaissance humanism and classical scholarship. This first English translation includes the famous letter about the discovery on the Via Appia of the perfectly preserved body of a Roman girl.

Cover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 2: Books II-III

Dialectical Disputations, Volume 2: Books II-III

Valla, Lorenzo
Copenhaver, Brian P.
Nauta, Lodi

The Dialectical Disputations, translated here for the first time into any modern language, is Lorenzo Valla’s principal contribution to the philosophy of language and logic. Valla sought to replace the scholastic tradition of Aristotelian logic with a new logic based on the historical usage of classical Latin and on a commonsense approach.

Cover: Commentaries on Plato, Volume 2: <i>Parmenides</i>, Part I

Commentaries on Plato, Volume 2: Parmenides, Part I

Ficino, Marsilio
Vanhaelen, Maude

Marsilio Ficino, the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus, was largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. His commentaries remained the standard guide to the philosopher’s works for centuries. Maude Vanhaelen’s new translation of Parmenides makes this monument of metaphysics accessible to the modern student.

Cover: Commentaries on Plato, Volume 2: <i>Parmenides</i>, Part II

Commentaries on Plato, Volume 2: Parmenides, Part II

Ficino, Marsilio
Vanhaelen, Maude

Marsilio Ficino, the Florentine scholar-philosopher-magus, was largely responsible for the Renaissance revival of Plato. His commentaries remained the standard guide to the philosopher’s works for centuries. Maude Vanhaelen’s new translation of Parmenides makes this monument of metaphysics accessible to the modern student.

Cover: Dialogues, Volume 1: Charon and Antonius

Dialogues, Volume 1: Charon and Antonius

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Gaisser, Julia Haig

Giovanni Pontano (1426–1503), whose academic name was Gioviano, was the most important Latin poet of the fifteenth century as well as a leading statesman who served as prime minister to the Aragonese kings of Naples. His Dialogues are our best source for the humanist academy of Naples which Pontano led for several decades.

Cover: Poems

Poems

Marullus, Michael
Fantazzi, Charles

Michael Marullus (c. 1453/4–1500), born in Greece, began life as a mercenary soldier but became a prominent Neo-Latin poet and scholar in Italy. Later poets imitated him in vernacular love poetry, especially Ronsard. This edition contains Marullus’s complete Latin poetry. All of these works appear in English translation for the first time.

Cover: Notable Men and Women of Our Time

Notable Men and Women of Our Time

Giovio, Paolo
Gouwens, Kenneth

Paolo Giovio’s dialogue provides an informed perspective on the sack of Rome in 1527, from a friend of Pope Clement VII. The work discusses literary style and whether the vernacular could surpass Latin as a vehicle for literary expression. This volume includes a fresh edition of the Latin text and the first translation into English.

Cover: On Exile

On Exile

Filelfo, Francesco
De Keyser, Jeroen
Blanchard, W. Scott

Francesco Filelfo’s On Exile depicts noblemen and humanists, driven from Florence by Cosimo de’ Medici, discussing the sufferings of exile—poverty and loss of reputation—and the best way to endure and profit from them. This volume contains the first complete edition of the Latin text and the first complete translation into any modern language.

Cover: Latin Poetry

Latin Poetry

Fracastoro, Girolamo
Gardner, James

A medical authority, Girolamo Fracastoro (1478–1553) was also a prominent Neo-Latin poet. This volume includes his didactic poem Syphilis, which gave the name to the disease and contains the first poetical description of Columbus’s discovery of America; a short Biblical epic, the Joseph; and the Carmina, a collection of shorter poetry.

Cover: Correspondence

Correspondence

Valla, Lorenzo
Cook, Brendan

Lorenzo Valla (1406–1457) was the leading philologist of the first half of the fifteenth century, as well as a philosopher, theologian, and translator. His extant Latin letters, though few, afford a direct and unguarded window into the working life of the most passionate, difficult, and interesting of the Italian humanists.

Cover: On Methods, Volume 1: Books I-II

On Methods, Volume 1: Books I-II

Zabarella, Jacopo
McCaskey, John P.

Jacopo Zabarella’s two treatises On Methods and On Regressus (1578) are among the most important Renaissance discussions of how scientific knowledge should be acquired, arranged, and transmitted. They belong to a lively debate about the order in which sciences should be taught and the method to be followed in demonstrations.

Cover: On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus

On Methods, Volume 2: Books III-IV. On Regressus

Zabarella, Jacopo
McCaskey, John P.

Jacopo Zabarella’s two treatises On Methods and On Regressus (1578) are among the most important Renaissance discussions of how scientific knowledge should be acquired, arranged, and transmitted. They belong to a lively debate about the order in which sciences should be taught and the method to be followed in demonstrations.

Cover: On the World and Religious Life

On the World and Religious Life

Salutati, Coluccio
Marshall, Tina

Salutati’s first surviving treatise was written for a lawyer who entered a Florentine monastery and requested a piece encouraging him to persevere in religious life. On the World and Religious Life is a wide-ranging reflection on humanity’s misuse of God’s creation and the need to orient human life with a proper hierarchy of values.

Cover: On Married Love. Eridanus

On Married Love. Eridanus

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Roman, Luke

Giovanni Pontano, the dominant literary figure of quattrocento Naples, wrote two brilliantly original poetical cycles. On Married Love is the first sustained exploration of married love in first-person poetry. Eridanus combines familiar motifs of courtly love with an allusive matrix of classical elegy and Pontano’s distinctive vision.

Cover: The Battle of Lepanto

The Battle of Lepanto

Wright, Elizabeth R.
Spence, Sarah
Lemons, Andrew

The defeat of the Ottomans by the Holy League fleet at Lepanto (1571) was among the most celebrated international events of the sixteenth century. The Battle of Lepanto anthologizes the work of twenty-two poets who composed Latin poetry in response to the news of the battle, the largest Mediterranean naval encounter since antiquity.

Cover: Political Writings

Political Writings

Salutati, Coluccio
Baldassarri, Stefano U.
Bagemihl, Rolf

Coluccio Salutati was chancellor of the Florentine Republic and leader of the humanist movement in Italy in the generation after Petrarch and Boccaccio. He was among the first to apply his classical learning to political theory and his rhetorical skills to the defense of liberty. This volume contains a new English version of his political writings.

Cover: Apologetic Writings

Apologetic Writings

Savonarola, Girolamo
Mulchahey, M. Michèle

Brought to Florence by Lorenzo de’ Medici as a celebrity preacher, Girolamo Savonarola (1452–1498), a Dominican friar, would play a major role in the convulsive events that led to the overthrow of the Medici themselves. The Latin writings in this volume, all composed in the year before he was hanged, are translated into English for the first time.

Cover: On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 1: Mystical Theology and The Divine Names, Part I

On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 1: Mystical Theology and The Divine Names, Part I

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.

In 1490/92 the Florentine Platonist Marsilio Ficino made new translations of two treatises he believed were the work of Dionysius the Areopagite, the disciple of St. Paul mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. They are presented here in new critical editions accompanied by English translations, the first into any modern language.

Cover: Life and Early Travels

Life and Early Travels

Cyriac of Ancona
Mitchell, Charles
Bodnar, Edward W.
Foss, Clive

Cyriac of Ancona (1391–1452) was among the first to study the physical remains of the ancient world in person and is sometimes regarded as the father of classical archaeology. This volume contains a life of Cyriac to the year 1435 by his friend Francesco Scalamonti, along with several letters and other texts illustrating his early life.

Cover: On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 2: The Divine Names, Part II

On Dionysius the Areopagite, Volume 2: The Divine Names, Part II

Ficino, Marsilio
Allen, Michael J. B.

In 1490/92 the Florentine Platonist Marsilio Ficino made new translations of two treatises he believed were the work of Dionysius the Areopagite, the disciple of St. Paul mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles. They are presented here in new critical editions accompanied by English translations, the first into any modern language.

Cover: Fiammetta. Paradise

Fiammetta. Paradise

Verino, Ugolino
Wilson, Allan M.

Ugolino Verino was a principal Latin poet in the Florence of Lorenzo de’Medici and a leading figure in the revival of ancient Latin elegy. He forged a distinctive voice in a three-book cycle of poems in honor of his lady-love, Fiametta. His Paradise is a vision-poem in which he tours Heaven and the afterlife.

Cover: A Translator’s Defense

A Translator’s Defense

Manetti, Giannozzo
McShane, Myron
Young, Mark

Giannozzo Manetti’s Apologeticus was a defense of the study of Hebrew and of the need for a new translation. It constituted the most extensive treatise on the art of translation of the Renaissance. This ITRL edition contains the first complete translation of the work into English.

Cover: The Greek Classics

The Greek Classics

Manutius, Aldus
Wilson, N. G.

Aldus Manutius was the most innovative scholarly publisher of the Renaissance. This ITRL edition contains all of his prefaces to his editions of the Greek classics, translated for the first time into English. They provide unique insight into the world of scholarly publishing in Renaissance Venice.

Cover: Angelinetum and Other Poems

Angelinetum and Other Poems

Marrasio, Giovanni
Chatfield, Mary P.

Giovanni Marrasio was esteemed in the Renaissance as the first to revive the ancient Latin elegy, and his Angelinetum, or “Angelina’s Garden,” and other poems explores that genre in all its variety, from love poetry, to a description of a court masque, to political panegyric, to poetic exchanges with famous humanists of the day.

Cover: My Secret Book

My Secret Book

Petrarca, Francesco
Mann, Nicholas

Petrarch was the leading spirit in the Renaissance movement to revive literary Latin, the language of the Roman Empire, and Greco-Roman culture in general. My Secret Book reveals a remarkable self-awareness as he probes and evaluates the springs of his own morally dubious addictions to fame and love.

Cover: Rome in Triumph, Volume 1: Books I–II

Rome in Triumph, Volume 1: Books I–II

Flavio, Biondo
Muecke, Frances
Pincelli, Maria Agata

Biondo Flavio was a pioneering figure in the Renaissance discovery of antiquity and popularized the term Middle Age to describe the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the revival of antiquity in his own time. Rome in Triumph is the capstone of his research program, addressing the question: What made Rome great?

Cover: Rome in Triumph, Volume 1: Books I–II

Rome in Triumph, Volume 1: Books I–II

Flavio, Biondo
Muecke, Frances
Pincelli, Maria Agata

Biondo Flavio was a pioneering figure in the Renaissance discovery of antiquity and popularized the term Middle Age to describe the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the revival of antiquity in his own time. Rome in Triumph is the capstone of his research program, addressing the question: What made Rome great?

Cover: Italy Illuminated, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Italy Illuminated, Volume 2: Books V–VIII

Flavio, Biondo
White, Jeffrey A.

Biondo Flavio was a pioneering figure in the Renaissance discovery of antiquity and popularized the term Middle Age to describe the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the revival of antiquity in his own time. Italy Illuminated is a topographical work exploring the Roman roots of Italy.

Cover: Selected Letters, Volume 1

Selected Letters, Volume 1

Petrarca, Francesco
Fantham, Elaine

Francesco Petrarca (1304–1374), one of the greatest of Italian poets, was also the leading spirit in the Renaissance movement to revive the cultural and moral excellence of ancient Greece and Rome. This two-volume set contains an ample, representative sample from his enormous and fascinating correspondence with all the leading figures of his day.

Cover: Selected Letters, Volume 2

Selected Letters, Volume 2

Petrarca, Francesco
Fantham, Elaine

Francesco Petrarca (1304–1374), one of the greatest of Italian poets, was also the leading spirit in the Renaissance movement to revive the cultural and moral excellence of ancient Greece and Rome. This two-volume set contains an ample, representative sample from his enormous and fascinating correspondence with all the leading figures of his day.

Cover: Humanism and the Latin Classics

Humanism and the Latin Classics

Manutius, Aldus
Grant, John N.

Aldus Manutius (c. 1451–1515) was the most important scholarly publisher of the Renaissance. His Aldine Press was responsible for more first editions of classical literature, philosophy, and science than any other publisher before or since. This volume presents Aldus’s prefaces to Latin classics and modern humanist writers, translated into English.

Cover: Commentary on Plotinus, Volume 4: <i>Ennead III</i>, Part 1

Commentary on Plotinus, Volume 4: Ennead III, Part 1

Ficino, Marsilio
Gersh, Stephen

Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) was the leading Platonic philosopher of the Renaissance and is generally recognized as the greatest authority on ancient Platonism before modern times. The I Tatti edition of his commentary on Plotinus, in six volumes, contains the first modern edition of the Latin text and the first translation into any modern language.

Cover: Against the Jews and the Gentiles: Books I–IV

Against the Jews and the Gentiles: Books I–IV

Manetti, Giannozzo
Baldassarri, Stefano U.
Pagliara, Daniela
Marsh, David

Giannozzo Manetti’s apologia for Christianity—Against the Jews and the Gentiles—redefines religion as true piety and relates the historical development of the pagan and Jewish religions to the life of Jesus. This volume includes the first critical edition of Books I–IV and the first translation of those books into any modern language.

Cover: Genealogy of the Pagan Gods, Volume 2: Books VI–X

Genealogy of the Pagan Gods, Volume 2: Books VI–X

Boccaccio, Giovanni
Solomon, Jon

Much more than a mere compilation of pagan myths, Boccaccio’s Genealogy of the Pagan Gods incorporates hundreds of excerpts from and comments on ancient poetry. It is both the most ambitious work of literary scholarship of the early Renaissance and a demonstration to contemporaries of the moral and cultural value of studying ancient poetry.

Cover: Commentaries, Volume 3: Books V–VII

Commentaries, Volume 3: Books V–VII

Pius II
Meserve, Margaret

Commentaries by Pius II (1405–1464)—the only autobiography ever written by a pope—was composed in elegant humanistic Latin modeled on Caesar and Cicero. This edition contains a fresh Latin text based on the last manuscript written in Pius’s lifetime and an updated and corrected version of the 1937 translation by Florence Alden Gragg.

Cover: Commentary on Plotinus, Volume 5: <i>Ennead III</i>, Part 2, and <i>Ennead IV</i>

Commentary on Plotinus, Volume 5: Ennead III, Part 2, and Ennead IV

Ficino, Marsilio
Gersh, Stephen

Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) was the leading Platonic philosopher of the Renaissance and is generally recognized as the greatest authority on ancient Platonism before modern times. The I Tatti edition of his commentary on Plotinus, in 6 volumes, contains the first modern edition of the Latin text and the first translation into any modern language.

Cover: Latin Poetry

Latin Poetry

Ariosto, Ludovico
Looney, Dennis
Possanza, D. Mark

In Latin Poetry, the erudite and playful works of one of Italy’s greatest poets, Ludovico Ariosto (1474–1533), are translated into English for the first time. This I Tatti edition provides a newly collated Latin text and offers unique insight into the formation of one of the Renaissance’s foremost vernacular writers.

Cover: Greek and Latin Poetry

Greek and Latin Poetry

Poliziano, Angelo
Knox, Peter E.

Angelo Poliziano (1454–1494) was one of the great scholar-poets of the Renaissance and a leading figure in the Florence during the Age of the Medici. This I Tatti edition contains all of his Greek and Latin poetry (with the exception of the Silvae in ITRL 14) translated into English for the first time.

Cover: On Human Worth and Excellence

On Human Worth and Excellence

Manetti, Giannozzo
Copenhaver, Brian P.

In On Human Worth and Excellence, celebrated diplomat, historian, philosopher, and scholar Giannozzo Manetti (1396–1459) asks: what are the moral, intellectual, and spiritual capabilities of the unique amalgam of body and soul that constitutes human nature? This I Tatti edition contains the first complete translation into English.

Cover: The Virtues and Vices of Speech

The Virtues and Vices of Speech

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Pigman III, G. W.

Giovanni Pontano, best known today as a Latin poet, also composed popular prose dialogues and essays. The De sermone, translated into English here for the first time as The Virtues and Vices of Speech, provides a moral anatomy of aspects of speech such as truthfulness, deception, flattery, gossip, bargaining, irony, wit, and ridicule.

Cover: Lives of the Milanese Tyrants

Lives of the Milanese Tyrants

Decembrio, Pier Candido
Ianziti, Gary
Zaggia, Massimo

Lives of the Milanese Tyrants includes biographies of two dukes of Milan—the powerful Filippo Maria Visconti and the mercenary captain Francesco Sforza—written by the most important Milanese humanist of the early fifteenth century, Pier Candido Decembrio. Both works are translated into English here for the first time from new Latin texts.

Cover: Miscellanies, Volume 1

Miscellanies, Volume 1

Poliziano, Angelo
Dyck, Andrew R.
Cottrell, Alan

In the Miscellanies, the great Italian Renaissance scholar-poet Angelo Poliziano penned two sets of mini-essays focused on lexical or textual problems. He solves these with his characteristic deep learning and brash criticism. The two volumes presented here are the first translation of both collections into any modern language.

Cover: Miscellanies, Volume 2

Miscellanies, Volume 2

Poliziano, Angelo
Dyck, Andrew R.
Cottrell, Alan

In the Miscellanies, the great Italian Renaissance scholar-poet Angelo Poliziano penned two sets of mini-essays focused on lexical or textual problems. He solves these with his characteristic deep learning and brash criticism. The two volumes presented here are the first translation of both collections into any modern language.

Cover: Food, Social Politics and the Order of Nature in Renaissance Italy

Food, Social Politics and the Order of Nature in Renaissance Italy

Grieco, Allen J.

Using a variety of analytical methods and theoretical approaches, this book moves food studies firmly into the arena of Late Medieval and Renaissance history, providing an essential key to deciphering the material and metaphorical complexity of this period in European, and especially Italian, history.

Cover: Dialogues, Volume 3: Aegidius and Asinus

Dialogues, Volume 3: Aegidius and Asinus

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Gaisser, Julia Haig

Dialogues, Volume 3 completes the I Tatti edition of Pontano’s five surviving dialogues. It includes Aegidius—which covers topics such as creation, free will, and the immortality of the soul—and Asinus, a fantastical comedy about Pontano going mad and falling in love with an ass. This is the first translation of these dialogues into English.

Cover: Dialogues, Volume 2: Actius

Dialogues, Volume 2: Actius

Pontano, Giovanni Gioviano
Gaisser, Julia Haig

Dialogues, Volume 2 by Giovanni Gioviano Pontano contains both a perceptive treatment of poetic rhythm, the first full treatment of the Latin hexameter in the history of philology, and a discussion of style and method in history writing. This is a new critical edition of the Actius and the first translation into English.

Cover: Abortion in Early Modern Italy

Abortion in Early Modern Italy

Christopoulos, John

John Christopoulos provides a comprehensive account of abortion in early modern Italy. Bringing together medical, religious, and legal perspectives, he explores the meanings of a practice that was officially banned yet widely practiced and generally tolerated, demonstrating that Italy was hardly a haven for Catholic anti-abortion absolutism.

Cover: Milan Undone: Contested Sovereignties in the Italian Wars

Milan Undone: Contested Sovereignties in the Italian Wars

Gagné, John

In 1499, Milan was an independent state with a stable government. But over the next thirty years, it descended into chaos amid the Italian Wars. John Gagné details Milan’s social and political breakdown. The Renaissance may have been the cradle of the modern nation-state, but it was also a time when sophisticated sovereigns collapsed.

Cover: Niccolò di Lorenzo della Magna and the Social World of Florentine Printing, ca. 1470–1493

Niccolò di Lorenzo della Magna and the Social World of Florentine Printing, ca. 1470–1493

Böninger, Lorenz

Lorenz Böninger tells the story of Niccolò di Lorenzo della Magna, a major printer of Renaissance Italy. Niccolò’s hitherto mysterious life and career provide unparalleled insight into the business of printing in its earliest years, illuminating the economic, legal, and intellectual forces that surrounded the publication and dissemination of texts.

Cover: Tuscany in the Age of Empire

Tuscany in the Age of Empire

Brege, Brian

The Renaissance was also the beginning of the Age of Empires, yet the Grand Duchy of Tuscany failed to secure overseas colonies. How did Tuscany retain its place in European affairs and intellectual life? Brian Brege explores the shrewd diplomatic moves and domestic investments that safeguarded the duchy’s wealth and influence amid globalization.

Cover: Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance

Love and Sex in the Time of Plague: A Decameron Renaissance

Ruggiero, Guido

Guido Ruggiero brings readers back to Renaissance Florence, capturing how the Decameron sounded to fourteenth-century ears. Giovanni Boccaccio’s masterpiece of love, sex, loyalty, and betrayal resonated amid the Black Death and the era’s convulsive political change, reimagining truth and virtue in a moment both desperate and full of potential.

Cover: Being a Jesuit in Renaissance Italy: Biographical Writing in the Early Global Age

Being a Jesuit in Renaissance Italy: Biographical Writing in the Early Global Age

Russell, Camilla

Founded in 1540, the Society of Jesus was instantly popular, attracting thousands of candidates in its first century. Camilla Russell looks to the lives and writings of early Jesuits to better understand the Society’s appeal, how it worked, and the ideas that drove Christian thinkers and missionaries during the Renaissance and early modern period.

Cover: Persian Manuscripts & Paintings from the Berenson Collection

Persian Manuscripts & Paintings from the Berenson Collection

Yoltar-Yıldırım, Ayşin

The Bernard and Mary Berenson Collection of Persian Manuscripts and Paintings at I Tatti presents an in-depth analysis of the little-known Persian manuscripts and paintings collected by the world-renowned art historian, art critic, and connoisseur Bernard Berenson. Fourteen essays focus on three manuscripts and four detached folios.

Cover: Life of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Oration

Life of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Oration

Pico della Mirandola, Gianfrancesco
Pico della Mirandola, Giovanni
Copenhaver, Brian P.

The Oration by philosopher Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–1494), to which later editors added the subtitle On the Dignity of Man, is the most famous text written in Italy at the height of the Renaissance. The Life of Giovanni by Gianfrancesco Pico, his nephew, is the only contemporary account of the philosopher’s brief and astonishing career.

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Cover: A Theory of Justice: Original Edition, by John Rawls, from Harvard University Press

John Rawls: Speaking in a Shared Political Language

On the occasion of the anniversary of the publication of A Theory of Justice, Andrius Gališanka, author of John Rawls: The Path to a Theory of Justice, reflects on some of Rawls’s ideas on moral and political reasoning