Audubon: Early Drawings

In 1805, Jean Jacques Audubon fled revolutionary violence in both Haiti and France to take refuge in frontier America. Ten years later, John James Audubon was an American citizen whose desire to “become acquainted with nature” led him to reinvent himself as a naturalist and artist. The drawings he made during this crucial decade, of specimens he collected in France and in America, are published together here for the first time in large format and full color.

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) Ivory-Billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis) Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) Chuck-Will’s Widow (Caprimulgus carolinensis) Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratoria) Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata) Common Merganser (Mergus merganser) Scops Owl (Otus scops) Black-Capped Avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta) Black-Bellied Plover (Pluvialis squatarola) Jacket: Audubon: Early Drawings, by John James Audubon, with a Foreword by Leslie A. Morris, Introduction by Richard Rhodes, and Notes by Scott V. Edwards, from Harvard University Press

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