Banner: The Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library / Jan M. Ziolkowski, General Editor

About Jan Ziolkowski, General Editor

Photo of Jan Ziolkowski, General Editor of the Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library

Jan Ziolkowski (A.B. Princeton University, Ph.D. University of Cambridge) has focused his research and teaching on the literature of the Latin Middle Ages. Within medieval literature his special interests have included such areas as the classical tradition in general, the grammatico-rhetorical tradition in particular (“Literary Theory and Criticism in the Middle Ages”), the appropriation of folktales into Latin, and Germanic epic in Latin language. At Harvard he has chaired the Department of Comparative Literature and the Committee on Medieval Studies, in addition to (fleetingly) the Department of the Classics. He founded the Medieval Studies Seminar, which continues to hold regular meetings in the Barker Center that are open to the public. In his teaching he offers courses mainly in Classics (Medieval Latin) and in Medieval Studies. Currently he also directs Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, a Harvard center in Washington, D.C., with programs in Byzantine studies, Pre-Columbian studies, and Garden and Landscape studies.

Language Editors

  • Daniel Donoghue, Old English Editor
  • Danuta Shanzer, Medieval Latin Editor
  • Alexander Alexakis, Byzantine Greek Coeditor
  • Richard Greenfield, Byzantine Greek Coeditor
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