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Loeb Mythological Essentials

  • Theogony. Works and Days. Testimonia
  • Homeric Hymns. Homeric Apocrypha. Lives of Homer
  • Hecale. Hymns. Epigrams
  • Metamorphoses, Volume I
  • The Library, Volume I

Author - Editorial Staff

Date - 31 October 2023

Time to read - 1 min

  • Theogony. Works and Days. Testimonia

    Theogony. Works and Days. Testimonia

    Hesiod, Glenn W. Most

    Antiquity’s original didactic poet.

    Hesiod describes himself as a Boeotian shepherd who heard the Muses call upon him to sing about the gods. His exact dates are unknown, but he has often been considered a younger contemporary of Homer.

    The first volume of this revised Loeb Classical Library edition offers Hesiod’s two extant poems and a generous selection of testimonia regarding his...

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  • Homeric Hymns. Homeric Apocrypha. Lives of Homer

    Homeric Hymns. Homeric Apocrypha. Lives of Homer

    Homer, Martin L. West

    Invocations, curiosities, and biographies connected with the famous Greek bard.

    Performances of Greek epics customarily began with a hymn to a god or goddess—as Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days do. A collection of thirty-three such poems has come down to us from antiquity under the title “Hymns of Homer.” This Loeb Classical Library volume contains, in addition to the Hymns, fragments o...

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  • Hecale. Hymns. Epigrams

    Hecale. Hymns. Epigrams

    Callimachus, Dee L. Clayman

    The premier scholar-poet of the Hellenistic age.

    Callimachus (ca. 303–ca. 235 BC), a proud and well-born native of Cyrene in Libya, came as a young man to the court of the Ptolemies at Alexandria, where he composed poetry for the royal family; helped establish the Library and Museum as a world center of literature, science, and scholarship; and wrote an estimated 800 volumes of poetry and p...

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  • Metamorphoses, Volume I

    Metamorphoses, Volume I

    Books 1–8

    Ovid, Frank Justus Miller

    The poetry of change.

    Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC–AD 17), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his Ars amatoria, and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold an...

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  • The Library, Volume I

    The Library, Volume I

    Books 1-3.9

    Apollodorus, James G. Frazer

    Antiquity’s most influential mythological handbook.

    The Library provides in three books a grand summary of traditional Greek mythology and heroic legends. Written in clear and unaffected style, the compendium faithfully follows the Greek literary sources. It is thus an important record of Greek accounts of the origin and early history of the world and their race. This work has been attribut...

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