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Loeb Philosophical Essentials

  • Euthyphro. Apology. Crito. Phaedo
  • Nicomachean Ethics
  • On the Nature of Things
  • Marcus Aurelius
  • Theological Tractates. The Consolation of Philosophy

Author - Editorial Staff

Date - 8 November 2023

Time to read - 1 min

  • Euthyphro. Apology. Crito. Phaedo

    Euthyphro. Apology. Crito. Phaedo

    Plato, Chris Emlyn-Jones, William Preddy

    The fundamental tetralogy on Socrates’ final days.

    Plato of Athens, who laid the foundations of the Western philosophical tradition and in range and depth ranks among its greatest practitioners, was born to a prosperous and politically active family circa 427 BC. In early life an admirer of Socrates, Plato later founded the first institution of higher learning in the West, the Academy, amon...

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  • Nicomachean Ethics

    Nicomachean Ethics

    Aristotle, H. Rackham

    Antiquity’s most influential account of life’s Supreme Good.

    Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BC, was the son of a physician. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367–347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil in Asia Minor. After some time at Mitylene, in 343–342 he was appointed by King...

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  • On the Nature of Things

    On the Nature of Things

    Lucretius, W. H. D. Rouse

    Atomic atheism in verse.

    Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus) lived ca. 99–ca. 55 BC, but the details of his career are unknown. He is the author of the great didactic poem in hexameters, De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things). In six books compounded of solid reasoning, brilliant imagination, and noble poetry, he expounds the scientific theories of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, with the...

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  • Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius

    Marcus Aurelius, C. R. Haines

    Stoic musings of a philosopher-emperor at war.

    Marcus Aurelius (AD 121–180), Roman emperor and Stoic philosopher, born at Rome, received training under his guardian and uncle emperor Antoninus Pius (reigned 138–161), who adopted him. He was converted to Stoicism and henceforward studied and practiced philosophy and law. A gentle man, he lived in agreement and collaboration with Antoninus Pi...

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  • Theological Tractates. The Consolation of Philosophy

    Theological Tractates. The Consolation of Philosophy

    Boethius, H. F. Stewart, E. K. Rand, S. J. Tester

    A Christian polymath embraces reason against misfortune in poetry and prose.

    Boethius (Boetius)—Anicius Manlius Severinus—Roman statesman and philosopher (ca. AD 480–524), was son of Flavius Manlius Boetius, after whose death he was looked after by several men, especially Memmius Symmachus. He married Symmachus’ daughter, Rusticiana, by whom he had two sons. All three men rose to high honor...

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