Digital and Interactive Multimedia Projects

Author Interview Archives:  Audio  |  Video  |  HUP at SoundCloud  |  HUP at YouTube

Digital Loeb Classical Library

Founded by James Loeb in 1911, the mission of the Loeb Classical Library has always been to make Classical Greek and Latin literature accessible to the broadest range of readers. The digital Loeb Classical Library (located at loebclassics.com) extends this mission into the twenty-first century.

Dictionary of American Regional English, Digital Edition

The Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE)—representing the full panoply of American regional vocabulary, from Adam’s housecat to Zydeco—has long been consulted by a wide range of scholars and lovers of language and regional nuance. The digital version, available now at daredictionary.com, transforms the dictionary into an interactive, multimedia tool that will greatly benefit both scholarly inquiry and general intellectual curiosity.

Emily Dickinson Archive

Harvard University Press’s long engagement with the works of Emily Dickinson extends to its contributions to the open-access Emily Dickinson Archive (edickinson.org), which makes available high-resolution images of manuscripts of Dickinson’s poetry and letters along with transcriptions and annotations from historical and scholarly editions. EDA is the product of a a growing collaboration that includes Amherst College, Beinecke Library at Yale University, the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, Boston Public Library, Digital Public Library of America, Emily Dickinson Lexicon at Brigham Young University, Harvard Library, Harvard University Press, and Houghton Library at Harvard.

Back to top

Law and Leviathan: Redeeming the Administrative State, by Cass R. Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule, from Harvard University Press

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter, by Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, from Harvard University Press

Technology, Biology, Chronology

Fears and anxieties about the latest technologies are nothing new, say Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, authors of Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter. But neither is the fact that they often provide new ways for us to connect and socialize. Mark Twain is rumored to have said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Of late, much press has been spent on uncovering those rhymes, focusing on the similarities between the current epidemic and past ones. These stories underscore the lesson that progress hasn't allowed us to escape the suffering of earlier