The Virginia and Warren Stone Prize

See also: Recent Awards | Book of the Year Citations | The Thomas J. Wilson Memorial Prize

The Virginia and Warren Stone Prize, established in 1995, is awarded periodically to an Outstanding Book on Education and Society published by Harvard University Press.

The winning books have been works of history, social science, psychology, and pedagogy, and have been intended for academic or general readers. What they have in common is a broad and interdisciplinary scope, an ambitious and subtle synthesis of research, and insistence on the impact of educational tradition and change, from pre-K through professional schools, on contemporary and future society.

Year Title Author
2013 How College Works Daniel F. Chambliss and Christopher G. Takacs
2012 What the Best College Students Do Ken Bain
2008 Learning a New Land: Immigrant Students in American Society Carola Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, and Irina Todorova
2006 Learning on the Job: When Business Takes On Public Schools Steven F. Wilson
2004 What the Best College Teachers Do Ken Bain
2002 Reaching Higher: The Power of Expectations in Schooling Rhona S. Weinstein
2001 Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds Richard J. Light
1999 Teaching in America: The Slow Revolution Gerald Grant and Christine E. Murray
1997 The Girl with the Brown Crayon Vivian Gussin Paley
1996 Cultural Psychology: A Once and Future Discipline Michael Cole
1995 Tinkering toward Utopia: A Century of Public School Reform David Tyack and Larry Cuban

Back to top

Bitter Reckoning: Israel Tries Holocaust Survivors as Nazi Collaborators, by Dan Porat, from Harvard University Press

Recent News

From Our Blog

Jacket: Virtue Politics: Soulcraft and Statecraft in Renaissance Italy, by James Hankins, from Harvard University Press

Q&A with James Hankins, author of Virtue Politics: Soulcraft and Statecraft in Renaissance Italy

With Virtue Politics, James Hankins has delivered a bold, revisionist account of the political thought of the Italian Renaissance—from Petrarch to Machiavelli—that reveals the all-important role of character in shaping society, both in citizens and in their leaders. We spoke to him about the importance of virtue to leadership in Renaissance Italy—and its relevance to our own time.

‘manifold glories of classical Greek and Latin’

The digital Loeb Classical Library (loebclassics.com) extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature.