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Sharmila Sen

Editorial Director

Photo of Sharmila Sen, Editorial Director

startquoteIn addition to overseeing Harvard University Press’s overall acquisitions program, I publish books that make lasting contributions to a wide range of subjects: current events, popular culture, religion, history, politics, Classics, literature, law, and science.

I have recently signed books on such diverse topics as wealth and animal behavior, how the British slave trade shaped modern medicine and health care, sex strikes, political correctness as an accusation, religion and cultural appropriation, “lady translators” and Western classics, how New York publishers accidentally invented world literature, the story behind the greatest literary biography of the twentieth century (Ellmann’s James Joyce), nineteenth-century American hair, and the half-forgotten wife of Vitruvius.

Lila Abu-Lughod, Mary Beard, Hans Belting, Fred Donner, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Ram Guha, Sari Nusseibeh, Robert Orsi, Richard Ovenden, Snigdha Poonam, Ingrid Rowland, Priya Satia, Aldo Schiavone, Nick Sousanis, Maria Tatar, Helen Vendler, and Donna Zuckerberg are some of the authors I have published at Harvard University Press.

My acquisitions also include the award-winning digital Loeb Classical Library, the critically-acclaimed bilingual series Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library and Murty Classical Library of India, as well as intellectual comic books that challenge the primacy of words over images.endquote

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The Brethren: A Story of Faith and Conspiracy in Revolutionary America, by Brendan McConville, from Harvard University Press

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene