Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman

Elizabeth Cobbs (previously Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman; see newer entry) is a historian, New York Times bestselling novelist, and documentary filmmaker. She is Melbern G. Glasscock Chair in American History at Texas A&M University and a Research Fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution. Cobbs is the author of several books on American history and winner of the Allan Nevins Prize.

Search Results: 2 found (sorted by format)
  • Click on a column heading to sort search results by title, author, etc.
  • Ordering multiple books? Check the box next to each item or use the “Select All” button, then click “Add to Cart.”
  • HUP eBooks are available from a variety of vendors.
  • Works in the E-ditions program are available from De Gruyter as PDF ebooks or print-on-demand hardcover volumes.
TitleAuthorFormatPublication DatePriceSelect Item
Cover: American UmpireAmerican UmpireHoffman, Elizabeth CobbsHARDCOVER03/04/2013$40.00
Cover: All You Need Is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960sAll You Need Is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960sHoffman, Elizabeth CobbsPAPERBACK10/02/2000$43.50
Page 1 of 1

Back to top

Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, by James L. Nolan, Jr., from Harvard University Press

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket, Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter, by Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, from Harvard University Press

Technology, Biology, Chronology

Fears and anxieties about the latest technologies are nothing new, say Luke Fernandez and Susan J. Matt, authors of Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings about Technology, from the Telegraph to Twitter. But neither is the fact that they often provide new ways for us to connect and socialize. Mark Twain is rumored to have said “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes.” Of late, much press has been spent on uncovering those rhymes, focusing on the similarities between the current epidemic and past ones. These stories underscore the lesson that progress hasn't allowed us to escape the suffering of earlier