T. H. Breen

Photo of T. H. BreenPhoto | S. C. BreenT. H. Breen is John Kluge Professor of American Law and Governance at the Library of Congress and Founding Director of the Chabraja Center for Historical Studies at Northwestern University. A former Guggenheim Fellow, he has taught American history at Oxford, Cambridge, and Yale universities and is James Marsh Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont. He is the author of many books, including George Washington’s Journey, winner of the History Prize of the Society of the Cincinnati and finalist for the George Washington Book Prize; and Marketplace of Revolution, winner of the Society of Colonial Wars Book Award. He is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and Times Literary Supplement.

Search Results: 2 found (sorted by date)
  • Click on a column heading to sort search results by title, author, etc.
  • Ordering multiple books? Check the box next to each item or use the “Select All” button, then click “Add to Cart.”
  • HUP eBooks are available from a variety of vendors.
  • Works in the E-ditions program are available from De Gruyter as PDF ebooks or print-on-demand hardcover volumes.
TitleAuthorFormatPublication DatePriceSelect Item
Cover: The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of AmericaThe Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of AmericaBreen, T. H.PAPERBACK04/06/2021$16.95
Cover: The Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of AmericaThe Will of the People: The Revolutionary Birth of AmericaBreen, T. H.HARDCOVER09/17/2019$29.95
Page 1 of 1

Back to top

Traveling Black: A Story of Race and Resistance, by Mia Bay, from Harvard University Press

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: We Have Never Been Modern, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Bruno Latour Wins Kyoto Prize

Congratulations to Bruno Latour for being named the 2021 Kyoto Prize laureate for arts and philosophy. To celebrate, here’s an excerpt from We Have Never Been Modern. By claiming that the modern Constitution does not permit itself to be understood, by proposing to reveal the practices that allow it to exist, by asserting that the critical mechanism has outlived its usefulness, am I behaving as though we were entering a new era that would follow the era of the moderns?