Catherine A. Sanderson

Photo of Catherine A. SandersonPhoto | Joanna ChattmanCatherine A. Sanderson is the Manwell Family Professor in Life Sciences at Amherst College and the author of The Positive Shift: Mastering Mindset to Improve Happiness, Health, and Longevity. She has written five college textbooks, including Real World Psychology, as well as widely-taught middle and high school health textbooks. Sanderson lectures around the country and was chosen by The Princeton Review® as one of the best college professors in America. Her work has been featured in the Atlantic and Washington Post and on CBS and NBC.

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TitleAuthorFormatPublication DatePriceSelect Item
Cover: Why We Act: Turning Bystanders into Moral RebelsWhy We Act: Turning Bystanders into Moral RebelsSanderson, Catherine A.PAPERBACK02/15/2022$18.95Not yet available
Cover: Why We Act: Turning Bystanders into Moral RebelsWhy We Act: Turning Bystanders into Moral RebelsSanderson, Catherine A.HARDCOVER04/07/2020$27.95
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Jacket: Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, by Julie Sedivy, from Harvard University Press

Lost in Translation: Reclaiming Lost Language

In Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, Julie Sedivy sets out to understand the science of language loss and the potential for renewal. Sedivy takes on the psychological and social world of multilingualism, exploring the human brain’s capacity to learn—and forget—languages at various stages of life. She argues that the struggle to remain connected to an ancestral language and culture is a site of common ground: people from all backgrounds can recognize the crucial role of language in forming a sense of self.