Daniel Aaron

Daniel Aaron was Victor S. Thomas Professor of English and American Literature, Emeritus, Harvard University.

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TitleAuthorFormatPublication DatePriceSelect Item
Cover: From a Darkened Room: The Inman DiaryFrom a Darkened Room: The Inman DiaryInman, Arthur C.
Aaron, Daniel
PAPERBACK10/01/1996$19.50
Cover: The Inman Diary: A Public and Private ConfessionThe Inman Diary: A Public and Private ConfessionInman, Arthur C.
Aaron, Daniel
HARDCOVER01/01/1985$112.50
Cover: Studies in BiographyStudies in BiographyAaron, DanielPAPERBACK04/25/1978$20.00
Cover: The Memoirs of an American CitizenThe Memoirs of an American CitizenHerrick, Robert F.
Aaron, Daniel
E-DITION01/01/1963$65.00Available from De Gruyter »
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Island on Fire: The Revolt That Ended Slavery in the British Empire, by Tom Zoellner, from Harvard University Press

From Our Blog

Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

“Predictive Policing” and Racial Profiling

While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”